in peer reviewed / M.Sc. / Allee effect / spillback / spillover / salmon / aquaculture on Thu 05 September 2013

The exchange of native pathogens between wild and domesticated animals can lead to novel disease threats to wildlife. However, the dynamics of wild host-parasite systems exposed to a reservoir of domesticated hosts are not well understood. A simple mathematical model reveals that the spill-back of native parasites from domestic to ...

Exchange of diseases between domesticated and wild animals is a rising concern for conservation. In the ocean, many species display life histories that separate juveniles from adults. For pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and parasitic sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis), infection of juvenile salmon in early marine life occurs near salmon sea-cage ...

Human food production activities can dominate natural systems, altering ecological and evolutionary aspects of the environment. Disease-mediated interactions are of particular concern. For example, parasites may "spill-over" from farms to wildlife. Parasites isolated on farms can evolve resistance to treatment chemicals , but "spill-back" from wildlife to farms may alter evolutionary ...